Discy Latest Questions

As an interviewer, I occasionally conduct interviews that become painful as time goes on because the candidate is doing so poorly. I have the impression that, in these cases, the candidate internally knows they are not getting the job, and ...Read more

As an interviewer, I occasionally conduct interviews that become painful as time goes on because the candidate is doing so poorly. I have the impression that, in these cases, the candidate internally knows they are not getting the job, and would just like to end things as soon as possible (as would I).

In the past, I have handled phone interviews of this type by ending a little early and giving a standard closing. However, I have empathy for the candidates and would feel better if I could say something nice without being dishonest. They’re not getting the job, but I may still respect them and honestly wish them well. I’m not really sure how I could tactfully express thoughts like this, though.

My question is mainly about phone-based interviews, but I’m interested in answers that also apply to in-person interviews. To be clear, this question is how, specifically, to be nice at the end of a bad interview, so I’m looking for something more specific than simply ask how to end a bad interview. (Hence I don’t consider this a duplicate of questions asking how to end a bad interview.)

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  1. When I was at Facebook, 2013–2016, the rumor I heard was the opposite. It was my understanding that Google practically had a policy of counter-offering anyone who got an offer from Facebook, and that seeking an offer from Facebook was a strategy Googlers used to up their compensation. Ironically, FaRead more

    When I was at Facebook, 2013–2016, the rumor I heard was the opposite.

    It was my understanding that Google practically had a policy of counter-offering anyone who got an offer from Facebook, and that seeking an offer from Facebook was a strategy Googlers used to up their compensation.

    Ironically, Facebook had the opposite policy: If you get an offer from elsewhere, it was Facebook’s policy not to counter-offer. Facebook’s view is that if they start counter-offering, they will get into a compensation arms race. And besides, if you really want to go work somewhere else, then maybe you should. There are lots of people who would love to work at Facebook; they don’t need to try to convince you to stay if you want to leave. And if you’re just bluffing, well good on them for not falling for it.

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If a Google employee reveals that he or she intends to leave because they have *accepted*–not received–an offer from a talent competitor like Facebook, in some cases they will be “walked off” so that they will no longer have access ...Read more

If a Google employee reveals that he or she intends to leave because they have *accepted*–not received–an offer from a talent competitor like Facebook, in some cases they will be “walked off” so that they will no longer have access to Google’s proprietary information. More important than having that employee leave the physical building is shutting off their employee account; and most tech knowledge workers can’t perform their jobs without access to the company’s Intranet, VPN, or email.

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  1. While we do say this literally sometimes in English, we have a more common idiom that many people would probably think of first, if they weren’t translating. You have to crawl before you can walk. At least in American English, this idiom is very popular.

    While we do say this literally sometimes in English, we have a more common idiom that many people would probably think of first, if they weren’t translating.

    You have to crawl before you can walk.

    At least in American English, this idiom is very popular.

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